まるです。

Sep. 18th, 2017 23:00
[syndicated profile] maru_feed

Posted by mugumogu

 

まるさん、こんな可愛らしいピーマンがあるんですけど。
Hey Maru, this is a pretty sweet pepper.

まる:「いらん!」
Maru:[No, thank you!]

じゃーん、増えましたー!
Ta-da! That increased.

まる:「増えてもいらん!」
Maru:[No! thank! you!]


はなさん、これーー
Hey Hana,


はな:「それいらないやつー。」
Hana:[No, thank you!]

珍しいものがあると、ついまる&はなにお披露目してしまう。

 

まるです。

Sep. 17th, 2017 23:00
[syndicated profile] maru_feed

Posted by mugumogu

 


箱に入っているねこちゃん。
A kitten is in the box.

の後ろに並んでいるまる。
えーと、そこで何をしているんでしょう?
Hey Maru, what are you doing there?

まる:「順番待ちですよ。早く出ないかなと思って。」
Maru:[Turn waiting. This cat should go out of the box quickly.]


まる:「あ、空いた。」
Maru:[It became vacant.]


まる:「もちろん入ってますよ。」(前足だけ)
Maru:[Of course, I am in the box.](Only front paw.)

まるです。

Sep. 14th, 2017 23:00
[syndicated profile] maru_feed

Posted by mugumogu

 


夜遊び中のまるの写真を撮っていたら、目のまえにひらひらと
何かが落ちてきたので拾い上げると――
Something fluttered down before me when I took his photograph at night.
And I picked it up.


まる:「見せて見せて!」
とすごい勢いで近寄ってくるまる。
Maru:[Show me it, please!]


あーなんかすごい期待しているみたいなんですけど、
虫とかじゃなくて楓の種でした。
You seem to expect it very much.
However, this is not an insect but seed of maple.


まる:「しょーもなっ!」
勝手に期待して勝手にふてくされる。
Maru:[I am disappointed!]

さあはなさん、そろそろ帰りましょうか?
Hey Hana, let’s return soon!

はな:「まだずーっと後で!」
Hana:[No! Long after!!]

Diary2018

Sep. 13th, 2017 23:00
[syndicated profile] maru_feed

Posted by mugumogu

 


2018年版ダイアリーが届きました。
これでようやく全部揃いました!
News about Maru’s Diary 2018. (These are sold only in Japan.)


はな:「えー何が揃ったってー?」
Hana:[What do you photograph?]

 まる:「まったくもう、チビは邪魔ばっかりして。」
Maru:[Hey Hana, you must not disturb the photography.]


まる:「男前に撮ってくださいよ。」
Maru:[I’m ready. Please take me handsomely.]

ああ、はい。
邪魔お手伝いありがとうございます。
Oh, ok.
Thank you for your disturb help.


ダイアリー中身


写真ページ


メモページ

ということで、改めてよろしくお願いいたします!
お取り扱い店舗は、全国のロフトや東急ハンズ、書店、雑貨店など。
各店舗によって販売開始時期が異なります。

【Amazon】
壁掛けカレンダー
卓上カレンダー
ダイアリー

楽天でもいくつかお取り扱い店があります。


 

optional commas

Sep. 12th, 2017 14:48
[syndicated profile] acommonlanguage_feed

Posted by lynneguist

I was tweet-talking with Lane Greene this morning about whether Americans' love for/Britons' indifference to optional commas can be quantified. And so I did a little experiment. And so I'm going to tell you about it.

For this I'm comparing the British National Corpus and the Corpus of Contemporary American English. (They're not 100% comparable, but they'll do.) In the BNC, there's on average 1 comma for every 20 words written. In COCA, it's 1:15. So, there are a lot more commas in the American corpus. (I tried this on the GloWBE corpus too, and got about 10% more commas in AmE than BrE–but it's harder to know in GloWBE that the writers are from the country that they're categori{s/z}ed in.)

That doesn't tell us that Americans like optional commas more, though. That could mean that Americans like the grammatical constructions that require commas more than Brits do. Or it could mean that Americans write longer lists than Brits do. To really know, we need to look in contexts where the comma might occur and see if it's there. I did this for one context last year and found that my American friends were about twice as likely to use a comma (versus not using one) in the phrase "Happy Birthday(,) Lynne", and my British friends patterned in the opposite way.


So here are a few more contexts.

After a short, sentence-initial adverbial: If you want to modify a sentence with 'when, where, why or how', you can use a prepositional phrase or an adverb. Usually, these wouldn't have commas around them, but, at the start of the sentence, they often do, to mark the particular prosodic (intonational) pattern that goes with such phrases and to help the reader know that the subject of the sentence has not turned up yet.

To look at this, I decided to try sentences that start with phrases like "In 1973..." So I searched the corpora for:
. In 19* (,) the
That is to say, a (BrE) full stop/(AmE) period followed by in followed by anything starting with 19 (which ended up just being year-names), then a comma or no comma, then the word the. The the ensures that I'm not getting longer phrases at the start. So every hit is something like "In 1973(,) the band released their best album" and not things like "In 190 years of customer service at their Oxford Street branch (,) they'd never before killed a customer". That way, I've got a uniform set of short sentence-initial adverbials. (The longer ones are more apt to have commas in BrE; it's just the short adverbials I'm testing.)

And this is what you get:


comma            none         ratio
UK      495 1095   1:2
US       3445 1449   2:1

In other words, (more than) twice as many commas as not in AmE, and the opposite in BrE—just as we found in the birthday vocatives. (The US corpus is much larger than the UK one, so it works best to compare the ratios between countries.)

On to the next context:
You can visit the Oxford Comma on Twitter
Pic by @rcasinelli

The serial/Oxford comma: I was once one of those people who thought that having a firm stand on the Oxford comma was a good thing. I now think it's pretty silly. We don't need tribalism in punctuation any more than we need tribalism in the rest of life. But oh well. There's a lot of it if you hang out in the part of Twitter that I hang out in.

A quick definition for those outside the punctuation-culture wars: the serial, or Oxford, comma is a comma before the conjunction (usually and or or) in a list of three or more. So:
Oxford:  I like blogs, dictionaries, and world peace.
Non-Oxford:  I like blogs, dictionaries and world peace.

Serial comma is the older (1922), orig.-AmE name for the thing. The term Oxford comma (after the Oxford University Press) is newer (1951) and now the more popular term in the US. Why? Because, as Mary Norris, in her Between You and Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen, puts it: Oxford “gives it a bit of class, a little snob appeal”. And that's what the punctuation-culture wars are about.  FiveThirtyEight found that Americans who prefer the Oxford comma tend to pat themselves on the back about their grammar knowledge. John McIntyre of the Baltimore Sun (quoted at last link) concludes that “Feigned passion about the Oxford comma, when not performed for comic effect, is mere posturing.”


Anyhow, Americans do have a reputation among editors for liking that comma more than Brits do.  
Is the reputation well founded?

I looked in the aforementioned corpora for
butter , [noun] (,) and [noun]       
men , women (,) and children
Why butter? Because if I tried to search for "noun, noun(,) and noun", the computer couldn't cope. I needed to stick a particular noun in there to bring the amount of data down. The second phrase gives me more data to work with, but since it's a set phrase, I didn't want to use just it in case it garbled the results. (In the end, there are apparently fewer discussions of ingredients in the BNC than COCA, so the butter examples didn't do much for the numbers. But I have to leave it at that because I need to get back to work.)

 And I found:


Oxford comma      none          ratio    
UK      4+1124+124     1:10
US       109+310129+434    1:1.3

So, it is true that Americans use the Oxford comma more than Brits do. But it's not true that Americans use the Oxford comma more than not.

And if you grew up in the US at the same time as I did, thinking about lists containing butter might make you think of this Sesame Street gem, now stuck in my head for the rest of the day:


まるです。

Sep. 11th, 2017 23:00
[syndicated profile] maru_feed

Posted by mugumogu

 


箱に入っているまるに「ブラッシング―。」と声をかける。
Hey Maru, it is time for brushing.

するとすぐさま足元にやってきて横たわる。
Maru goes out of the box immediately and lies.

まる:「ブラッシングですね。スタンバイOKです。」
Maru:[It’s ok!]

まるさん、いい艶してますねぇ。
Your fur has very good luster.

まる:「まあ良く言われますけどね。」
Maru:[Thanks.]


はい、ふさふさ猫ちゃんのできあがり!
Brushing was finished.


ブラッシングに満足すると、まるはまた箱に返っていく。
Maru returned to the box immediately.


さあ、次ははなさんの番ですよー。
Hey Hana, it is your turn.


はな:「あー、あたしはいいや。」
Hana:[No, thank you.]

ブラッシングがそれほど好きではないはなは、
連れてこられて渋々座る。
Because Hana does not like brushing very much, she sits down unwillingly.

はな:「ちゃっちゃと終わらせてよね。」
Hana:[Please end it quickly.]


はな:「はい終了~。」
Hana:[Time is up!]


収穫はこれだけ。
There are very few crops…

 

まるです。

Sep. 10th, 2017 23:00
[syndicated profile] maru_feed

Posted by mugumogu

 


よくブラインドから外を覗いているまる。
外から見るとどう見えるのだろうと思い、外に行ってみることに。
Maru looks out of the window shade well.
I decided to see him from the outside.


早速まるがごそごそとやってきた。
Maru came over promptly.

 


まる:「外が騒々しいですね。」
Maru:[The outside is noisy.]

まる:「なんかよく見えないんですけど!」
Maru:[Wow, I can’t look well!]

不細工だったり。
Funny Maru.

イケメン風だったり。
Cool Maru.

まる:「外の世界異常なーし。」
Maru:[There is no abnormality in the outside world!]

 


まる:「で、いつまでそこにいるんですか?」
Maru:[And until when will you be there?]

 

まるです。

Sep. 7th, 2017 23:00
[syndicated profile] maru_feed

Posted by mugumogu

 

出しっぱなしになっていた買い物バッグにちょっかいを出しているはな。
Hana meddles in a shopping bag.


はな:「えいえい、このこの!」
Hana:[I stamp this. And I scratch at this.]

するとまるがぬっと現われた。
Then Maru appeared from there.

はな:「えーいたのーぜんぜん知らなかった―。」
Hana:[Were you there all the while? I didn’t know that at all.]


はな:「じゃーねー!」スタコラサッサー。
Hana:[Bye!]


まる:「あのチビめ!」
Maru:[Hey, wait!]

まるです。

Sep. 6th, 2017 23:00
[syndicated profile] maru_feed

Posted by mugumogu

 

爪とぎポールを登ったりする猫ちゃんもいますが、
まる&はなは垂直登りは苦手。そこでちょっとでも木登りの雰囲気を楽しめるよう、梯子をかけてみました。
Maru&Haha is not good at tree climbing.
So I placed a ladder against the tree.


まる:「梯子わーい。」
Maru:[Thank you for the ladder!]


まる:「ふむふむ、木の上はこうなってるんですね。」
Maru:[Very interesting. ]


まる:「おっと危ない!」
降りる途中で足を踏み外したまる。
Maru:[Oops!]
Maru lost his footing.


はな:「だいじょーぶー?」
Hana:[Are you ok?]


はな:「木の匂い~♪」
Hana:[I enjoy the smell of the tree♪]

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